How to Install Glass Tile

Glass tile is a beautiful material that can bring light and shine to any room in a house, creating a clean modern-yet-classic look. Sheets of paper-faced glass tile make setting tile easier by mostly eliminating individual tile setting, but you can also get traditional tiles made from glass.

Before you start tiling, make sure that whatever surface will be supporting the tiles will be strong and structurally sound. You don’t want to do all this beautiful tile work just to have to tear it down in two years! This means checking the wall studs if you’re putting the tile on a wall, the subfloor and floor joists if you’re tiling a floor, or the counter base and tile backing if you’re tiling a countertop. Learn more…

Glass Tile

How to Install a Glass Mosaic Tile Backsplash

Greasy splatters and messy spills present no challenge to a backsplash made of tile, one of the easiest-to-clean materials for the stain-prone spot behind a range or sink. And the subtle color variations of translucent glass mosaic tile offer a rich look that makes this area a real eye-catcher in your kitchen. Mounted on 12×12 sheets of paper, the 3/4-inch tiles are simple to install and will fit around cabinets and counters with few cuts. Even better, grouting the tile with a new urethane-based, nonporous product means you won’t need to apply sealant to keep your backsplash looking spiffy. Learn more…

Measure and Lay Out the Backsplash

Measure from top of counter to bottom of cabinet and plan your tile layout (Image 1). Incorporate any accent tiles that you have planned for the design. Mark the center point of the wall and, with a level, draw a horizontal line across the wall from end to end. Also measure up from the finished countertop to the bottom lip of the upper cabinets to determine the number of tile rows needed. Make sure to include 1/8″ grout lines in your measurements. Learn more…

Install a Kitchen Glass Tile Backsplash

Measure the length of your wall where you’ll install the backsplash and check to make sure the vertical row of tiles that will end up in any corner between two walls can be cut wider than half the tile width. (You don’t want to end up with slivers of tile. If that’s what you can expect, consider shifting all the tiles toward the inside corner and leaving a gap between the outside vertical row of tiles and the wall edge.) Do the same with the height of the backsplash. Lay tiles on the countertop where you’ll install them on the wall and mark the wall above each tile edge as a guide for applying tile mastic — the adhesive that holds the tile in place — in 3-ft sections. Learn more…

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